The Man Says Covid-19 Was Worse Than Cancer

According to real-world data from two large healthcare systems in the Midwest, cancer patients undergoing active treatment saw their chance of mortality climb 15-fold with a COVID-19 diagnosis in the early months of the epidemic.

Does Remedesivir And Hydrochloroquine Cause Lower Mortality Rate?

Interestingly, when compared to patients who received other investigational COVID-19 therapies, such as hydroxychloroquine (aOR 0.41, 95 percent CI 0.17-0.99), the 57 patients treated with remdesivir alone had lower all-cause mortality at 30 days (aOR 0.41, 95 percent CI 0.17-0.99) and a trend toward lower mortality when compared to patients who received no other invest (aOR 0.41, 95 percent CI 0.17 (aOR 0.76, 95 percent CI 0.31-1.85).

The Man Says Covid-19 Was Worse Than Cancer

According to Shirish Gadgeel, MD, of the Henry Ford Cancer Institute in Detroit, among nearly 40,000 patients who had undergone cancer treatment at some point in the previous year, 15% of those diagnosed with COVID-19 died between February and May 2020, compared to 1% of those who were not diagnosed with COVID-19 during the same timeframe.

According to studies given at the American Association for Cancer Research (AACR) COVID-19 and Cancer meeting, 11 percent of those identified with COVID-19 died compared to 1 percent of those who were not diagnosed with COVID-19.

“Some comorbidity was more common in COVID-19 patients,” Gadgeel explained. “Cardiac arrhythmias, renal failure, congestive heart failure, and pulmonary circulation abnormalities were among the conditions.”

Gadgeel and colleagues looked at data on 154,585 malignant cancer patients with active cancer or a history of cancer treated at two major Midwestern health systems from 2015 to the present. From February 15 to May 13, 2020, 388 of the 39,790 patients with active illness were diagnosed with COVID-19. COVID-19 was found in 412 of the 114,795 patients having a history of cancer.

After optimizing for a variety of factors, older age (70-99 years) and a number of comorbid diseases were found to be significantly linked to increased death among COVID-19 patients with active cancer:

  • OR 3.4 if you’re older (95 percent CI 1.3-9.3)
  • OR 3.0 for diabetes (95 percent CI 1.5-6.0)
  • Renal failure has an OR of 2.3. (95 percent CI 1.1-4.9)
  • OR 3.9 for pulmonary circulation diseases (95 percent CI 1.4-10.5)

Those aged 60 to 69 years (OR 6.3, 95 percent CI 1.1-35.3), 70 to 99 years (OR 18.2, 95 percent CI 3.9-84.3), and those with a history of coagulopathy had a higher risk of death in COVID-19 patients with a history of cancer (OR 3.0, 95 percent CI 1.2-7.6).

Despite the fact that Black patients made up less than 10% of the entire study population, Gadgeel noted that 39.4 percent of COVID-19 diagnoses in the current cancer group and a third of diagnoses in the cancer survivor group were among Black patients.

COVID-19 patients in both groups had a higher proportion of COVID-19 patients with a median household income below $30,000, he added. COVID-19 was associated with a significantly higher risk of hospitalization, both for patients with active cancer (81 percent vs 15 percent for those without COVID-19) and those with a history of cancer (68 percent vs 6 percent), with higher rates of hospitalization among Black people and those with a median income below $30,000. Hospitalization was common among COVID-19 patients as young as 50 years old, with 79 percent of those with active malignancy and 49 percent of those with a history of the disease.

 COVID-19 and the Cancer Consortium (CCC-19) have been revised, and there are currently 114 sites (including comprehensive cancer centers and community sites) collecting data on cancer patients and their outcomes with COVID-19.

The first results from the consortium, which included roughly 1,000 patients, were presented at the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) annual meeting earlier this year and published in The Lancet. The use of hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin to treat COVID-19 in cancer patients was linked to a roughly threefold increased chance of dying within 30 days, according to early analysis.

Interestingly, when compared to patients who received other investigational COVID-19 therapies, such as hydroxychloroquine (aOR 0.41, 95 percent CI 0.17-0.99), the 57 patients treated with remdesivir alone had lower all-cause mortality at 30 days (aOR 0.41, 95 percent CI 0.17-0.99) and a trend toward lower mortality when compared to patients who received no other invest (aOR 0.41, 95 percent CI 0.17 (aOR 0.76, 95 percent CI 0.31-1.85).

The presence of cancer was linked to a higher chance of death. Patients with stable (aOR 1.47, 95 percent CI 1.07-2.02) or advancing disease (aOR 2.96, 95 percent CI 2.05-4.28) disease had a higher risk of death at 30 days than those in remission.

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